Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) » About Us

Funding Partnerships

ESRP offers a competitive project selection process that is based on a rigorous process and is aligned with regional ecosystem recovery needs identified by PSNERP, the nearshore component of the Action Agenda for Puget Sound. Our evaluation criteria are not focused on single species, but instead steer us towards projects that can restore the underlying ecological processes necessary to create and sustain nearshore habitats. ESRP’s evaluation process focuses on core criteria that should be essential to any grant program (e.g. ecological importance, technical merit, readiness, cost-effectiveness and public support) and allows our evaluation criteria to be readily adapted to support diverse program partnerships.

Benefits of program partnerships are:

  • Increased funding for sound-wide priorities that advance the Action Agenda and Puget Sound recovery
  • Diversification of funding sources provides greater flexibility to meet matching requirements
  • Greater range of technical resources to support programs and project sponsors
  • Use of existing competitive process and contracting reduces administrative burden for project sponsors and
Wetlands
  • EPA's National Estuary Program Partnership
  • NOAA's Community-Based Restoration Program
EPA's National Estuary Program Partnership
EPA logo

In February 2011, EPA awarded more than $21 million to state, tribal and federal organizations for the restoration and protection of Puget Sound. Together, Washington Departments of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Natural Resources (DNR) were awarded EPA funding for marine and nearshore restoration and protection in Puget Sound.  A portion of these funds were targeted for 'strategic capital investments'. 

The Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) was quickly identified as an effective mechanism that could be used to allocate EPA funds for strategic capital investments in Puget Sound marine and nearshore environments. ESRP was recognized as having a competitive, science-based approach to selecting projects that advance process-based restoration and protection as called for by the Action Agenda and the Puget Sound Nearshore Restoration Project.

Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Protection and Restoration Grant Program

With funding from EPA's National Estuaries Program, The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Washington State Department of Natural Resources have developed the Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Grant Program. Its goal, is to  invest the National Estuary Program (NEP) funding in ambitious and innovative actions that are consistent with the Puget Sound Action Agenda and produce measurable outcomes tied to 2020 Puget Sound marine and nearshore ecosystem recovery targets.  EPA funds are targeted to the following investment areas:

  • Effective Regulation and Stewardship
  • Strategic Capital Investments (implemented through ESRP)
  • Programs to Address Additional High Priority Threats: Invasive Species
  • Programs to Address Additional High Priority Threats: Oil Spills
  • Cross-Cutting Issues

For more information click here: http://www.wdfw.wa.gov/grants/ps_marine_nearshore/

Investment Strategy

Since, 2011 nearly $1.4 million in EPA funds have been awarded to projects contained in ESRP's 2011 Investment Plan. Working with EPA and the Marine and Nearshore grant program, these funds were distributed to top-ranking projects based on jointly developed criteria that supported the goals of the National Estuary Program, advanced salmon recovery and implemented needed actions identified in the Action Agenda for Puget Sound.

2010 EPA Funds - $674,000 were directed to projects based on three criteria:

  1. Ready to go and could be implemented quickly
  2. Provided increased protection (acquisition)
  3. Focused on protection of shorelines and sediment supply
Table 1. Projects selected to receive EPA FY2010 Funds
Project Sponsor EPA Award
Barnum Point Shoreline Acquisition The Nature Conservancy $213,333
Dabob Bay Natural Area Acquisition The Nature Conservancy $213,333
Point Heyer Drift Cell Preservation King County $213,333

2011 EPA Funds - $684,000  were focused on "ready to go" restoration efforts based on the following criteria:

  1. Anchored on public or tribal lands
  2. Result in large acreage restored relative to the investment
  3. Are large river delta projects that integrate one or more of the following: agricultural preservation, flood protection, and/or ecosystem- restoration
  4. Utilize cost-effective approaches (e.g. Puget Sound Corps, volunteers, low-cost partners etc.)
Table 2. Projects selected to receive EPA FY2011 Funds
Project Sponsor EPA Award
Port Susan Bay Dike Removal The Nature Conservancy $162,450
Skokomish Estuary Restoration Phase III Mason Conservation District $162,450
Milltown Island/S. Fork Skagit Restoration Skagit River Systems Cooperative $162,450
Woodard-Chapman Bay Fill Removal Department of Natural Resources $162,450

2012 EPA Funds (up to $2.7 million) will be targeted towards shoreline restoration projects that address shoreline modifications and remove impediments to sediment input and delivery.

NOAA's Community-Based Restoration Program
NOAA logo
NOAA Restoration Center Contacts in Puget Sound:
  Paul Cereghino paul.r.cereghino@noaa.gov
  Polly Hicks
Polly.Hicks@noaa.gov
  Jason Lehto
Jason.A.Lehto@noaa.gov
NOAA
Restoration Atlas

The NOAA Restoration Center’s Community-based Restoration Program invests funding and technical expertise in high-priority habitat restoration projects that instill strong conservation values and engage citizens in hands-on activities. Through the program, NOAA Restoration Center staff work in collaboration with regional partners such as the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to determine where they can have the biggest impact on restoring the nation’s coastal habitats, and where funding and technical assistance are needed the most. 

In 2007, NOAA's Restoration Center and WDFW  entered a 3-year partnership agreement through WDFW's Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program.   Through this partnership, over $1.2 million in federal funding was used combined with state funds to implement a number of important nearshore ecosystem restoration projects in Puget Sound. In addition to financial project support,  NOAA Restoration Center staff have provided significant technical support in development of the grant program, review of  project proposals and support during implementation.  This support was pivotal in making this new program a success in protection and restoring thousands of acres of coastal habitat and natal Chinook estuaries.

Project NOAA Awards
Crescent Harbor Tidal Reconnection $ 92,000
Klingel Marsh Restoration $ 20,000
Little Quilcene Estuary Rehabilitation $ 100,000
Lower Dosewallips River Restoration $ 49,500
Milltown Island/S. Fork Restoration $ 55,000
Pitship Barrier Estuary Reconnection $ 40,000
Red Salmon Slough Levee Removal and Revegetation $ 56,594
Skokomish Estuary Restoration – Phase II Nalley Island $ 90,000
Skokomish Estuary Restoration - Phase III Skokomish Flats $ 20,000
Stavis NRCA Barrier Estuary Restoration $ 131,745
Turner’s Bay Restoration $ 150,000
Wiley Slough Dike Removal $ 86,806

More information on these and other projects funded by NOAA's Restoration Center can be found on NOAA's Restoration Atlas.


Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Protection and Restoration Grant Program

With funding from EPA's National Estuaries Program, The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Washington State Department of Natural Resources have developed the Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Grant Program. Its goal, is to  invest the National Estuary Program (NEP) funding in ambitious and innovative actions that are consistent with the Puget Sound Action Agenda and produce measurable outcomes tied to 2020 Puget Sound marine and nearshore ecosystem recovery targets.  EPA funds are targeted to the following investment areas:

dot Effective Regulation and Stewardship
dot Strategic Capital Investment (directed through ESRP)
dot Programs to Address Additional High Priority Threats: Invasive Species
dot Programs to Address Additional High Priority Threats: Oil Spills
dot Cross-Cutting Issues

 

Contact Info:

PSMarineNSGrants@dfw.wa.gov

 

For more information:

www.wdfw.wa.gov/grants/
ps_marine_nearshore/

WDFW Website

 

Location:
Natural Resources Building
1111 Washington St. SE
Olympia, WA 98501
Mailing Address:
Natural Resources Building
600 Capitol Way N
Olympia, WA 98501
Jay Krienitz, ESRP Manager
Phone: 360.902.2572
Email: esrp@dfw.wa.gov